2-Mercaptobenzothiazole

codes geen / geen

 

 

Formula

CAS

C7H5NS2

149-30-4

 
CAS: Chemical Abstract Service Registry Number
 

Background

Mercaptobenzothiazole is a thiazole rubber accelerator which are the most common accelerators used in the production of rubber. Accelerators are agents used to speed up the vulcanization process of cross-linking polymer chains.
Mercaptobenzothiazole is the most commonly identified allergen in allergic contact dermatitis due to shoes in the United States and accounts for 15% to 45% of positive patch tests in patients tested in various series for shoe dermatitis.
Mercaptobenzothiazole is second to the thiurams as the etiologic agent in allergic contact dermatitis due to gloves.

 

Synonyms

2-Benzathiazalethiol
2-Mercaptobenzothiazole
Captax
Dermacid
MBT
Mercaptobenzothiazole
Mertax
Nocceler M
Rotax
Thiotax

 

Uses

Accelerator
Anticorrosive agents
Antifreeze
Cements and adhesives
Condoms and diaphragms
Cutting oils
Detergents
Flea and tick powder
Fungicides
Gloves household, work, or hospital
Greases
Leather shoes insoles, adhesive linings
Medical devices
Photographic film emulsion
Renal dialysis equipment
Retarder
Rubber in undergarments and clothing
Rubber pillows and sheets
Rubber shoes sneakers, tennis shoes, etc.
Sponge makeup applicators and rubber eyelash curiers
Swimwear
Tires and tubes
Toys
Veterinarian products such as tick and flea powders and sprays

 

Cross-Reactions

 

 

Unusual Reactions

 

 

References

1.

Mitchell, J.C., Patch testing with mixes. Note on mercaptobenzothiazole mix. Contact Dermatitis, 1981. 7(2): p. 98-104.

2.

Rudzki, E., T. Napiorkowska, and I. Czerwinska-Dihm, Dermatitis from 2-mercaptobenzothiazole in photographic films. Contact Dermatitis, 1981. 7(1): p. 43.

3.

Lynde, C.W., et al., Patch testing with mercaptobenzothiazole and mercapto-mixes. Contact Dermatitis, 1982. 8(4): p. 273-4.

4.

Ancona, A., R. Suarez de la Torre, and J.R. Evia, Dermatitis from mercaptobenzothiazole in a Foley catheter. Contact Dermatitis, 1985. 13(5): p. 339-40.

5.

Foussereau, J., et al., Contact allergy to safety shoes. Contact Dermatitis, 1986. 14(4): p. 233-6.

6.

Jung, J.H., et al., Isolation, via activity-directed fractionation, of mercaptobenzothiazole and dibenzothiazyl disulfide as 2 allergens responsible for tennis shoe dermatitis. Contact Dermatitis, 1988. 19(4): p. 254-9.

7.

Wang, X.S. and R.R. Suskind, Comparative studies of the sensitization potential of morpholine, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole and 2 of their derivatives in guinea pigs. Contact Dermatitis, 1988. 19(1): p. 11-5.

8.

Wang, X.S. and M.W. Tabor, Studies of the reactivity of morpholine, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole and 2 of their derivatives with selected amino acids. Contact Dermatitis, 1988. 19(1): p. 16-21.

9.

Wilkinson, S.M., P.H. Cartwright, and J.S. English, Allergic contact dermatitis from mercaptobenzothiazole in a releasing fluid. Contact Dermatitis, 1990. 23(5): p. 370.

10.

Kaniwa, M.A., et al., A method for identifying causative chemicals of allergic contact dermatitis using a combination of chemical analysis and patch testing in patients and animal groups: application to a case of rubber boot dermatitis. Contact Dermatitis, 1992. 27(3): p. 166-73.

11.

Hansson, C. and G. Agrup, Stability of the mercaptobenzothiazole compounds. Contact Dermatitis, 1993. 28(1): p. 29-34.

12.

Ikarashi, Y., T. Tsuchiya, and A. Nakamura, Evaluation of contact sensitivity of rubber chemicals using the murine local lymph node assay. Contact Dermatitis, 1993. 28(2): p. 77-80.

13.

Saha, M., et al., Footwear dermatitis. Contact Dermatitis, 1993. 28(5): p. 260-4.

14.

Emmett, E.A., et al., Skin elicitation threshold of ethylbutyl thiourea and mercaptobenzothiazole with relative leaching from sensitizing products. Contact Dermatitis, 1994. 30(2): p. 85-90.

15.

Emmett, E.A., et al., Skin elicitation threshold of ethylbutyl thiourea and mercaptobenzothiazole with relative leaching from sensitizing products [published erratum appears in Contact Dermatitis 1994 Sep;31(3):208]. Contact Dermatitis, 1994. 30(2): p. 85-90.

 

 

 

 

 

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